Reading

Reading Unit 3
Reading Comprehension
Venice is sinking. Each year, millions of tourists rush to see this unique city in Italy before it disappears in the sea. The travelers themselves are probably unaware that their combined weight is adding to the problem. Venice has suggested imposing a tax on all visitors, to help pay for restoration of the ancient buildings and public squares and to finance research into ways of preventing further sinking.

As we begin the new century, there are 1.6 billion tourists roaming the world, and the impact of tourism can be devastating. Some say that tourism is ruining the planet. But how and to what extent should we impose restrictions on the tourists’ right to go wherever they wish?

New groups of “green” tourists or “eco-tourists” are upset by the effects of mass tourism on coastal regions such as those of the Mediterranean. They suggest that only low-volume tourism should be allowed. They don’t want the world’s picturesque places to be destroyed by the hordes of people who go there to experience the natural beauty. It’s ironic that these same “green” tourists travel to some of the most sensitive spots on earth, where the environmental impact of even a few visitors can be very severe. How many people can visit the Galapagos Islands off the coast of Ecuador without affecting the ecological balance? And how should we decide who is allowed to visit and who isn’t?

Still other groups point out the damage to local communities, customs and crafts that results from the arrival of huge groups of tourists. Tourism is almost always portrayed as evil. But do local people always want to stay the way they are? Why should they not enjoy the economic benefits of tourism? In many places, it’s tourism that’s actually keeping alive or even reviving the local traditions and crafts, as well as the economy.

So how should the recent explosion of tourism be managed? The travel industry – airlines, hotels, cruise companies – should work with local councils and government agencies to agree upon realistic standards for planning and development in tourist areas. More frequently, the tourist destinations themselves are beginning to realize that they don’t want to “kill the goose that laid the golden egg.” The Caribbean island of St. Lucia, for example, recently turned down a plan to build a cable car and restaurant on the top of Pitons, the island’s twin volcanic peaks.

It may become necessary for the United Nations to work out international agreements and strict environmental controls on the tourist industry. A lot of little steps can help to ensure that the earth’s unspoiled travel destinations remain unspoiled for future generations of tourists.
Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer for the questions below:
1
What is the best meaning of “devastating” as used in the paragraph 2?
2
How are the first and last sentences of paragraph 4 connected?
3
What is the main purpose of the phrase “So how” in the paragraph 5?
4
According to the passage, what is one way Venice would use the money from a “tax on all visitors”?
5
Quotation marks are used around the word “eco-tourists” in the paragraph 3 to indicate _____?
6
According to the passage, what benefit can tourism bring to the local people?
7
Why did Caribbean island of St. Lucia reject a plan to build a cable car and restaurant on the top of Pitons?
8
Which of the following best describes the author’s attitude in this passage?
New words/ New phrases
Roam:
/roʊm/
(v.)
Đi rong chơi, đi lang thang
Spend your morning on the beach then roam the rolling vineyards and sample local wines in the afternoon.
As we begin the new century, there are 1.6 billion tourists roaming the world, and the impact of tourism can be devastating to the environment.
Severe:
/sɪˈvɪr/
(adj.)
Khốc liệt, dữ dội, nghiêm trọng
The tourists travel to some of the most sensitive spots on earth, where the environmental impact of even a few visitors can be very severe.
Strikes are causing severe disruption to all train services.
Unspoiled:
/ʌnˈspɔɪld/
(adj.)
Nguyên sơ
A lot of little steps can help to ensure that the earth’s unspoiled travel destinations remain unspoiled for future generations of tourists.
Last holiday, I went to a wonderful island with clean, unspoiled beaches with my family.
Picturesque:
/ˌpɪktʃəˈresk/
(adj.)
Đẹp như tranh vẽ
The hotel also boasts a fine-dining restaurant on its premises and picturesque scenery on the grounds of the hotel.
They don’t want the world’s picturesque places to be destroyed by the hordes of people who go there to experience the natural beauty.
Revive:
/rɪˈvaɪv/
(v.)
Làm sống lại, phục hồi:
In many places, it’s tourism that’s actually keeping alive or even reviving the local traditions and crafts, as well as the economy.
Skeptics fear that these small, cheap reactors will not be enough to revive the nuclear industry.
Environmental impact:
/ɪnˌvaɪrənˈmentl ˈɪmpækt/
(n. phr.)
Tác động môi trường
This report analyzes the environmental impacts of the tourism industry, which is the third largest retail industry in the United States, behind only automotive dealers and food stores.
The basic problem with tourism development is that tourism facilities and the tourists themselves have environmental impacts.
It’s ironic that...:
/aɪˈrɑːnɪk/
Thật nực cười khi..., thật mỉa mai khi...
It’s ironic that the same green tourists travel to some of the most sensitive spots on earth.
It's ironic that she became a teacher—she used to hate school.
The hordes of...:
/hɔːrdz/
(n. phr.)
Hàng đoàn
They don’t want the world’s picturesque places to be destroyed by the hordes of people who go there to experience the natural beauty.
There are always hordes of tourists here in the summer.
Impose smt on smt:
/ɪmˈpoʊz/
(v. phr.)
Áp đặt cái gì đó lên cái gì
It was noticeable how a few people managed to impose their will on the others.
But how and to what extent should we impose restrictions on the tourists’ right to go wherever they wish?
Work out:
(phr. v.)
Hiểu, tìm ra
The fossils will also help scientists work out the mechanics of how early birds flew.
There is a new article says that in just six easy steps you can work out whether he's the one for you.
Turn down:
(phr. v.)
Từ chối
The Caribbean island of St. Lucia recently turned down a plan to build a cable car and restaurant on the top of Pitons, the island’s twin volcanic peaks.
Johnny Wilkinson was approached by the Lions, but turned down the opportunity to go on the tour to Australia due to fitness reasons and his club commitments.
Agree upon smt:
(v. phr.)
Đồng ý về
The travel industry – airlines, hotels, cruise companies – should work with local councils and government agencies to agree upon realistic standards for planning and development in tourist areas.
After a long negotiation, we have finally agreed upon the major points of the summer holiday contract.
Practice

Choose the best answer for the following questions.

1
The brain uses several ways to _____ the location of different parts of the body.
2
Even when sales were slow, she insisted that her husband ____ commercial illustration projects and focus on painting.
3
His idea was that bringing down the deficit would allow bond yields and interest rates to fall, and help _____ the economy.
4
Sales managers ______ the aisles of high volume call centers.
5
He tends to ______ his ebullience on the music, whether or not the music demands it.
Translation
The Impact of Tourism
Venice is sinking. Each year, millions of tourists rush to see this unique city in Italy before it disappears in the sea. The travelers themselves are probably unaware that their combined weight is adding to the problem. Venice has suggested imposing a tax on all visitors, to help pay for the restoration of the ancient buildings and public squares, and to finance research into ways of preventing further sinking.
As we begin the new century, there are 1.6 billion tourists roaming the world, and the impact of tourism can be devastating. Some say that tourism is ruining the planet. But how and to what extent should we impose restrictions on the tourists’ right to go wherever they wish?
New groups of “green” tourists or “eco-tourists” are upset by the effects of mass tourism on coastal regions such as those of the Mediterranean. They suggest that only low-volume tourism should be allowed. They don’t want the world’s picturesque places to be destroyed by the hordes of people who go there to experience their natural beauty. It’s ironic that these same “green” tourists travel to some of the most sensitive spots on earth, where the environmental impact of even a few visitors can be very severe. How many people can visit the Galapagos Islands off the coast of Ecuador without affecting the ecological balance? And how should we decide who is allowed to visit and who isn’t?
Still other critics point out the damage to local communities, customs and crafts that results from the arrival of huge groups of tourists. Tourism is almost always portrayed as evil. But do local people always want to stay the way they are? Why should they not enjoy the economic benefits of tourism? In many places, it’s tourism that’s actually keeping alive or even reviving the local traditions and crafts, as well as the economy.
So how should the recent explosion of tourism be managed? The travel industry – airlines, hotels, cruise companies – should work with local councils and government agencies to agree upon realistic standards for planning and development in tourist areas. More frequently, the tourist destinations themselves are beginning to realize that they don’t want to “kill the goose that laid the golden egg.” The Caribbean island of St. Lucia, for example, recently turned down a plan to build a cable car and restaurant on the top of Pitons, the island’s twin volcanic peaks.
It may become necessary for the United Nations to work out international agreements and strict environmental controls on the tourist industry. A lot of little steps can help to ensure that the earth’s unspoiled travel destinations remain unspoiled for future generations of tourists.
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